VoiceOverKids

.agency

INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN'S VOICE OVER CASTING AGENCY & RECORDING STUDIO

Real Kids & Child voice over actors from all over the world

AMERICAN (US) ENGLISH KIDS VOICE OVERS I VOICE CASTING SAMPLES

Lileine

Sound age 7-11

Lucy

Sound age 6-8

Riley

Sound age 11-15

Asher

Sound age 5-7

Jaden

Sound age 11-15

Cade

Sound age 7-11

Farah

Sound age 7-11

Lila

Sound age 8-12

Jonah

Sound age 7-11

Sia

Sound age 10-12

Kiara

Sound age 7-11

Nick

Sound age 8-12

American US English children voice overs. American US English children voice over. American US English children voice talents. American US English  Kid voice over. American US English children boy voice over. American US English children voice talents. American US English  Kids voice talents. American US English children´s voice overs agency. American US English  voice overs agency for children voice overs. American US English  children voice over rates.  American US English  Kids voice overs. American US English  teenage voice overs. American US English Kid voice actors. American US English children voice over services. American US English  child voice over actors. American US English children's voice over agency

About the American English language

American English sometimes called United States English or U.S. English is the set of varieties of the English language native to the United States. English is the most widely spoken language in the United States and in most circumstances is the de facto common language used in government, education, and commerce. Currently, American English is the most influential form of English worldwide. American English varieties include many patterns of pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and particularly spelling that are unified nationwide but distinct from other English dialects around the world. Any American or Canadian accent perceived as without noticeably local, ethnic, or cultural markers is popularly called "General" or "Standard" American, a fairly uniform accent continuum native to certain regions of the U.S. and associated nationally with broadcast mass media and highly educated speech. However, historical and present linguistic evidence does not support the notion of there being one single "mainstream" American accent.The sound of American English continues to evolve, with some local accents disappearing, but several larger regional accents having emerged in the 20th century.